A holiday trip through time… from one of Montavilla’s historic newspapers

By PATRICIA SANDERS

Montavilla Times, December 19, 1929

How did Montavillans back in the 1920s get in the holiday spirit? Fortunately, there are answers in the Montavilla Times. In December, it ran holiday ads for local businesses, art, stories, poems, cartoons, and short notices about holiday-doings.

The Montavilla Times was one of five to six Montavilla weeklies that covered the neighborhood over the years.

After the demise of the Montavilla News (about 1912) and the Montavilla Sun (1915), Albert E. Hill (1868 – 1940), a veteran newspaper man from Chicago, began the Montavilla Times in 1921. Several editors later, it ceased publication in 1941 or 1942.

It’s not easy to find copies of these old neighborhood newspapers, but fortunately the University of Oregon Knight Library has microfilm copies of the Montavilla Times from 1926 to 1931, the source images in this article. (I’ll have more to say about this and other Montavilla newspapers at a later date.)

Montavilla Times, December 9, 1926

Christmas shopping, as now, was a favorite activity and Larson’s dry goods store had a big variety from toys to garments. In 1926, it was located on NE 80th Avenue just north of SE Stark Street. By 1927, it had moved to what is now 8015 SE Stark, where La Bouffe International Gourmet is today.

Montavilla Times, December 16, 1926

Then there was charity work. The Montavilla PTA and the Glenhaven PTA provide baskets for the Montavilla needy.

Montavilla Times, December 16, 1926

Seasonal humor was a popular filler.

Montavilla Times, December 16, 1926

And, of course, eating out. In 1926, Walter G. Parsons transformed his confectionery store into a restaurant named either for a popular song of the day or the rose variety. Today’s address, 7928 SE Stark Street is now the location of Johnny’s Barber Shop, KB Framing, and the Guitar Studio.

Hear the song here.

Montavilla Times, December 8, 1927

Montavilla Times, December 15, 1927

Back when you had ice and coal delivered, Montavilla Ice and Coal Company supplied both needs. Today the current address, 408 SE 79th Avenue, is home to the Portland Garment Factory.

Montavilla Times, December 16, 1926

Electrical appliances made popular gifts. Today Howard Hardware is Salon Avenue, 7545 NE Glisan Street.

Montavilla Times, December 5, 1929. 

Circle No. 1, a social organization, holds a Christmas party at Mrs. Shuler’s house on Prescott Street. Come dressed as a child or as in old-fashioned garb, they requested; your choice.

Montavilla Times, December 5, 1929

The Pacific Telephone and Telegraph Company thinks a telephone would make a great gift, then as now.

Montavilla Times, December 15, 1927

This garage was located on part of the property where Highland Christian Center is today on NE Glisan Street between 76th and 78th Avenues.

Montavilla Times, December 8, 1927

Candies and cigars! This sweet shop was located on a portion of the Highland Christian Center property, but back it was next to the Granada Theatre, which began showing “talkies” (films with sound) on in 1929.

Montavilla Times, December 27, 1928

The Granada Theatre put on special New Year’s Eve programs. The movies would have been silent. This theatre started showing talkies in spring, 1929. The 50 cents admission would be $7.61 today.

Montavilla Times, Dec. 26, 1929 and Dec. 29, 1927

Happy holidays!

***

Historical story ideas? Questions about Montavilla’s past? Also share a love for neighborhood history? 

Comment on the article at the link in the heading. Or you can reach out to Pat Sanders at pat.montavilla.history@gmail.com.

Read all of the “Montavilla Memories” articles by Pat Sanders here.

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